Invisible Man Review Unseen Chills and Creeps

For the wary, this Invisible Man review will be spoiler-free. Or at least as spoiler free as possible. Nothing like having someone ruin the movie before you even get a chance to see it, right? And trust me, if you like thrills and chills, you’ll want to see this movie.

I’ve heard several people talk about how the trailer showed the whole movie. Now, I will admit the second trailer definitely shows a lot of the film. However, I wouldn’t say these things ruin the film or the suspense. But, I can definitely see why someone would think they do. To that I say, see the movie anyway. There’s enough good stuff that you don’t see in the trailer to make it worthwhile

The image shows the poster of the Invisible Man, which is the subject of this review. The poster is black with a little bit of Elisabeth Moss's face on the edge.

Good, now that bit of business is out of the way, we can move full onto the Invisible Man review. First, I liked this movie a lot. It’s a quiet movie about trauma and gaslighting and disbelief. Cecilia Kass (Elisabeth Moss) leaves her controlling fiance and tries to start a new life. This proves to be difficult, though, as her fear and paranoia of him continue to run her life.

Invisible Man Review Social Commentary and Believing Women

What I found interesting about this aspect of the movie is that we don’t see Adrian, the boyfriend, as being controlling. By that I mean we don’t see him do it on the screen. We only hear her telling it. Whether this is a purposeful decision by the filmmakers, or happy accident I don’t know. I do know that it works, though. It helps establish Cecilia as possibly being unreliable. And it further adds to the social commentary the film offers. We should of course believe women when they come to us with tales of abuse. But if we don’t see that abuse, it might be difficult for us to trust or believe. As the movie continues, this trust issue comes up time and time again.

This is a fairly uncomfortable movie to watch. Not because there’s a lot of gore and violence, but rather due to the psychological torture Cecilia suffers. It’s highly reminsent of Sleeping With the Enemy. Plus, I mean invisible people are just fucking creepy anyway. You don’t know if they’re there. How could you? And the quietness of this movie really adds to that paranoia.

The Soundtrack Adds to the Suspense

I know I’ve said the movie is quiet a few times, and it is. But I feel I should clarify and say by quiet I mean there isn’t a lot of explosions and gunfire. The soundtrack, though, is quite loud, oppressive, and quite effective in setting and maintaining the tone. Elisabeth Moss puts in a masterful performance, as do the few supporting characters. But this is her movie, and she carries it with ease.

This isn’t a movie you must see in the theater, but I think seeing it in the cinema adds to the experience. At home you feel maybe a little safer, so you might not be watching the shadows as intently. In the cinema, though you are in unfamiliar surroundings, and someone might be in those shadows, or in that empty seat next to you. It adds a layer of fear to an already creepy situation.

So there’s my review of the Invisible Man. I hope you enjoyed reading it, and I hope you see the movie. If you want to talk about it, hit me up in the comments.

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