Spooky Track Series 4: Who Can It Be Now

For spooky track series 4, I have chosen Who can it be Now? Written by Men at work, and released in 1981, this song is a paranoid fever dream. The low bass and the saxophone set the tone for this look into a frightened man’s mind. Colin Hay’s vocals are low and subdued, almost sardonic, which act as a nice contrast to the subject matter.

The image shows the Australian cover to Who Can It Be Now, the track featured for the spooky track series 4 in this post.

So, right off the bat because of the sax and the vocals, listeners know we have entered an odd world. Perhaps, one that is two inches to the left of normality (whatever that is.) And sure, this song may not be creepy and haunting like Joan Crawford, but it’s still creepy.

This spooky track series 4 song gives us a glimpse of the paranoia of the 80s. More than that, however, it transcends its time, and is applicable to today’s world. We’re all a bit more paranoid now. Presenting the thought processes of someone who wants to be left alone adds a dimension to what could have just been a banging pop song. However, by adding this elements of agoraphobic paranoia, Men at Work treat us to morbidly funny tune that can still make our minds squirm with psychological fear.

Again, I realize this is probably an odd choice for a spooky track series 4, but at the same time I think it works. The lyrics are vivid and address one man’s fear of society. And that is what a lot of horror is: fear of the world around us. Rarely has there been a song that captures that thought with such a fun and upbeat soundtrack.

What do you think? Does this song deserve a listing on the spooky track series 4, or am I off my rocker? Let me know in comments.

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Spooky Track Series 3: Joan Crawford is a Zombie

For spooky track series entry 3, I have chosen Joan Crawford by Blue Oyster Cult. This is one freaky song, and not just because of the allusion to the Phantom of the Opera.

Now, what makes this song a worthy spooky track Series 3 installment is the horror Eric Bloom describes. Here we see a world where junkies in Brooklyn go crazy and laugh like dogs, while policemen hide behind the skirts of little girls. These first images set the stage for the rest of the song, and let the listener know all is not well.

The image shows the cover of Blue Oyster Cult's Fire of Unknown Origin which spooky track series 3, Joan Crawford comes from

To be fair, and to repeat myself, the intro piano sets the stage for the fear to come. But then the drums, guitar and bass kick in, thumping and thudding. Finally, the vocals start, and they are full of the whining plea of someone who has seen horrors beyond imagination. Throughout the song the drums and bass keep a refrain that almost feels like the jerky movements of a zombie. This is fitting, as the song is about Joan Crawford’s return from the grave. And really, that’s what makes this song so unsettling. The driving percussion of the band helps us visualize Joan’s rotting corpse, moving twisted and jagged as she searches for her daughter.

As for the lyrics, schoolgirls throw away their mascara and chain themselves to big Mac trucks. This is not rational behavior, further solidifying the creepy factor of the song. Near the end, there is a cacophony of noise that threatens to overwhelm the senses, before that thrumming bass beat returns. And with that bass beat comes the gravelly whisper: “Christina, Mother’s home. Come to mother.”

Guaranteed to give you goosebumps. I hope this spooky track series 3 selection surprised you. Let me know what you thought. Leave a comment.

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Three Versions of Stagger Lee: Waits, Cave, Hurt

When I taught Czech university students I played them three versions of Stagger Lee. And, since it was a conversation class, I had them discus the similarities and differences before telling them my thoughts. As an ESL teacher, it’s important to avoid injecting your own bias as much as possible. I’m not always successful, but I try.

The first of the three versions of Stagger Lee I played was Mississipi John Hurt’s (Stack O’ Lee). Many consider this version the definitive story of Stagger and William DeLyons. And that makes sense. It did come out in 1928, after all. Things of note in this version: Stack strikes fear in the community. He’s a cruel man and a bad man, and the cops can’t, don’t, or won’t arrest him. The myth of Stack or Stag as pure evil is on full display here. Also notable, Billy steals Stack’s stetson hat, and Stack kills him for it. Keep this detail in mind for later. Also of note, Stack uses a .44 to kill Billy. Something else to keep in mind. Finally, in this version, the law hangs Stack, and everyone is happy.

So, to recap, this first version of the story is the oldest and sets the template. All other tellings of this story owe it. At some point, though no mention of it occurs in this telling, the story evolves into a gambling disagreement. In some of those variations, Billy cheats Stagger Lee, and Stag kills him for it. Still, no matter how you slice it, the core of the story is that Stack/Stag is a menace to his community. People fear him and the police are powerless. He’s the Boogeyman, only real. In his telling, Nick Cave takes this theme to the extreme.

Three Versions of Stagger Lee: Nick Cave Gets Explicit

If Mississippi John Hurt gives us the menace that is Stack O Lee, Nick Cave gives us the terror of that man. Hurt’s version is subtle and understated. Cave’s version is everything but that. Stagger Lee, as interpreted by Cave is a brash and vile murderer. He’s also making a name for himself as evidenced by him having to tell the bartender who he is.

He’s a killer and a rapist. He is as immoral as they come, but still somehow cool. If Tarantino wrote songs, he would share co-writing credit with Cave.

It was interesting playing this second of the three versions of Stagger Lee to my class because it is so different. They were college students, and I warned them of the explicit nature. Still, I did worry that I was crossing the line of good taste. Of course, Nick Cave and good taste don’t go hand in hand. Thankfully, my students didn’t report me to the bosses.

And, they drew the obvious connections: Pork pie hat, bad man. But they also noticed the differences: in Cave’s rendition, Stag is much sexier (explicit). Seriously, listen to that groove, and tell me it doesn’t ooze sex. You can’t.

Another difference between this telling and Hurt’s is that Stag gets away with it. The song ends with Stagger forcing Billy to perform fellatio and then killing him. In an extended version, which I didn’t play for my students, Stagger is worse. He rapes the devil if you can believe it.

Nearly a century passed between Hurt’s version and Cave’s version, which accounts for the visceral difference. Of course, others were playing around with the legend of Stagger Lee in between, and that leads me to Waits’ Small Change.

Tom Waits’ Small Change Is A Different Telling of the Same Story

Now, in all my admittedly limited, research, I’ve yet to find anyone else connecting Small Change to Stagger Lee. But I stand by the connection. Both Stack O Lee by MJH and Stagger Lee by NC tell the story of a bad man with a hat and a gun. Sure, this isn’t much to go on, but the similarities to Small change are too close to deny. All three versions of Stagger Lee mention a hat, a gun, and the general fear of the community. The big difference is Hurt and Cave concern themselves with how nasty the titular character is.

Waits, on the other hand, acknowledges he’s nasty, but adds some optimism to the story. In Small Change, the communal menace gets killed on the street. And the killer uses his own gun, a .38. Here’s something interesting, in Hurt’s version it’s a .44. In Cave’s version it’s a .45. The caliber of the weapon grows in accordance with the menace. Yeah, Hurt’s version is a bad and cruel man, but he is only a simple murderer. Cave’s .45 wielding maniac is a rapist, a terror, and larger than life. Of course he wields the biggest weapon of the three versions of Stagger Lee I am discussing.

Small Change is Billy, Not Stagger Lee

That was the argument made by a student when I played these three songs. She argued that Small Change was Billy. Her reasons: the name, the hat, and the gun. Basically, Small Change, with his .38 is the odd man out. Not only is his name not Stagger or Stack, he’s got a pea shooter. Yes, Small Change terrorizes the neighborhood, but he’s fallible. It’s not the police who capture him, and he doesn’t live. In fact, his killer remains unknown. “Someone will head south until this whole thing cools off.” He doesn’t exude the overall menace of the other two. I am [paraphrasing because it’s been years, but that’s the gist.

On one hand, I can see this. I don’t necessarily agree with it, but I can see it. More importantly, I appreciated this amount of thought and consideration from my student, and she made a logical and compelling argument. It happens to be one I think doesn’t hold up, but one I still think about nearly 10 years later.

Small Change is a Version of Stagger Lee

While I respect my student’s idea about this, I disagree. For one, in Small Change people are happy to see him die, just as they are in the other songs. In none of these three versions are people happy at Billy’s death.

Two, his death offers a chance at a better life: “The dreams aren’t broken now, they’re waling with a limp. Now that Small Change got rained on with his own .38.” Billy’s death would do no such thing.

Third, the newsboy steal the hat. If Stagger Lee were alive, that newsboy would be dead.

So, there you have my thoughts on three different versions of Stagger Lee as filtered through a teaching experience I once had. I hope you enjoyed reading this long diatribe.

The image shows the cover of a Stagger Lee comic, which is a fourth version of the three Stagger Lee stories in this post
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