All Roads End Here Apocalyptic Bleakness

All Roads End Here, a novel by David Moody is apocaylptic bleakness at a frantic pace. From the very start, the desperation of the world never fails to jump off the pages. Moody has created a cracked world in danger of splitting completely apart. In a nutshell, this novel is about a virus or some other afflction that turns many people into Haters. What’s a Hater? Hater used to be human, but now they have only the desire to destroy the Unchanged (non-Hater humans). If you think of the creatures in 28 Days Later, you’ll be on the right track. Only, the haters have some intelligence, and aren’t complete mindless brutes. Just mostly.

The picture shows the cover to All Roads End Here by David Moody. The cover is red and black

The book takes place in an English city, and the main character, Matthew Dunne, ha spent nearly three months in the wasteland. For three months, Matt survived by avoiding Hater patrols and sacrificing friends and acquaintances. His one goal: to get home to his girlfriend Jen. Matt’s willingness to do anything to get to Jen is noble, and provides motivation. However, keeping Jen safe seems to be his only reason for survival, which I find off-putting.

Finally, he reaches the city only to find it a Mad Max style warzone. Helicopters hover, strafing the hordes of Haters massing and attacking the city. Troops and bombers make appearances as well. The descriptions of the battles engage and excite, and there is a lot to like about this book in the early goings.

All Roads End Here Lacks Character

However, as the novel progresses and we see more of Matt and the people living at his house with his girlfriend, the excitement wears off. At least, that’s how it was for me. Moody writes excellent descriptions, and he builds a well realized world about to collapse. Unfortunately, he doesn’t populate that world with characters I care about, making it difficult to invest in the story.

When reading this type of novel, I find I need characters to latch onto. They don’t have to be sympathetic. Nevertheless, I like it when they aren’t complete assholes. And that is my biggest issue with All Roads End Here–I don’t like any of the characters. Actually, I can’t stand any of the characters. They could be real people, which is probably why I don’t like them. In a world where society has gone to shit, I need people I can root for and feel a connection with.

Did I root for Matt? Of course I did because he is the protagonist. Having Matt as the point of view character forces the reader to side with him, at least a little. He’s telling the story, and we want that story to continue. Therefore, we want him to live. At least for a little while.

For me, the novel became repetitious and lost a little bit of momentum for a stretch near the final third of the novel. Thankfully, it was a short stretch of pages, but it did solidify why the book wasn’t clicking for me. The reason I felt things were slowing down and becoming a slog is at that point I didn’t care about the characters. Even Matt. Once I accepted that, it was easy to finish the book.

Last Thoughts

Overall, I would say All Roads End Here is worth the read, especially if you like post-apocalyptic literature and genre pieces. It has some vivid descriptions and exciting set pieces. The battle-bus, and the waste management segments come quickly to mind.

My biggest issue was that I didn’t care if the characters lived or died. This isn’t Moody’s fault, simply a missed connection between reader and author. No one changed by the end of the proceedings, and I don’t find static characters particularly interesting.

Have you read this novel? If not, maybe give it a shot. As always, thanks for reading.

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